Architect: Pierre-François-Léonard Fontaine

Hide-and-Seek

Hide-and-Seek

By Iris Moon

The square and compass have long been architecture’s symbols of the trade, but practitioners sometimes used scissors to shape space. French architect Pierre-François-Léonard Fontaine made this cut-out paper model of an interior in or before 1804, the year in which his famous client, Napoleon, became emperor. It represents a simply… Read More

Archives, or Ardor

Archives, or Ardor

By Iris Moon

Butter, fire, ardor: Roberto Calasso tells us that Vedic India is one of the earliest civilisations and one about which the least is known, having left nothing behind but a few fragments of enigmatic texts about worship and sacrifice. No buildings, no palaces, no traces of temples. Just the simple instructions… Read More

Fontaine

Fontaine

By Ana Araujo

A fresh alternative to the intellectual and formal mannerisms associated with architectural drawings in the West since the age of Leon Battista Alberti, Pierre-François-Léonard Fontaine’s drawing explores a simple, direct way of communicating a spatial proposition. To access his vision we don’t need to be familiar with the conventions of… Read More

Fontaine: Market Stalls

Fontaine: Market Stalls

By Basile Baudez

Architectural historians have focused on the history of drawing as one of project design tools. By applying the methods of art history, one can trace colour as a key player in the long history of rivalry and exchange between European traditions in architectural drawing and practice. While Italian Renaissance drawings… Read More

Seven Farmyards

Seven Farmyards

Views of A Civic Utopia

Views of A Civic Utopia

Work on Paper: The changing metropolis 1815–1900

Work on Paper: The changing metropolis 1815–1900

By Niall Hobhouse and Nicholas Olsberg

Part I: Shifting scales and structures The transformation of the modern metropolis is not so much about expanding urban mats and changing topographic patterns as about how architects responded, structure by structure and type by type, to the shifting scales, capacities and ways of working that the city demanded of… Read More

Architectural anxiety

Architectural anxiety

By Niall Hobhouse and Nicholas Olsberg

This instalment explores the rich pathologies of architectural anxiety: the nagging pressure of what architects know and admire, or have seen and rejected. Or of what it is in the work of other architects, and in their own past practice, which they are driven always to acknowledge in the buildings… Read More