Architect: Karl Friedrich Schinkel

On Cornices, Part I

On Cornices, Part I

By Emma Letizia Jones

In 1806, the civil servant Karl Tilebein and his wife were looking for an architect to design their new country house in Züllchow, Pomerania. They contacted the young Prussian architect Karl Friedrich Schinkel, who, having recently returned from a two-year grand tour of Italy, was back in Berlin eking out… Read More

Kurt Forster

Kurt Forster

By Kurt Walter Forster

Schinkel’s architecture is of a piece with his life, yet in various ways, by picturing and publishing the work, he took himself out of it. He wanted to make sure that his architecture could stand on its own, however deeply it had been a part of him. He was, in… Read More

Schinkel: ‘Precisely Loose’

Schinkel: ‘Precisely Loose’

By Lok-Kan Chau

What light may Schinkel’s drawings shed on Building Information Modelling (BIM) practice? In 1806 the young Schinkel was asked to develop a residence design from a set of initial layout plans. He drew a façade section, a peristyle detail and a column capital, before the war began and the commission… Read More

Karl Friedrich Schinkel

Karl Friedrich Schinkel

By Basile Baudez

In his designs for the Tilebein House, Schinkel makes considerable use of different colours corresponding to the nature of the materials depicted. To indicate iron he uses a darkish blue, for wood mostly yellow and, of course, when he wants to show cut masonry (he is building in brick), he… Read More

Work on Paper, part IV: Displaced persons

Work on Paper, part IV: Displaced persons

By Niall Hobhouse and Nicholas Olsberg

Architects are extraordinarily reluctant to incorporate into their visual descriptions of buildings any evidence that the real subject their structures serve, and around whose activities they are so carefully formulated, is people. Here’s a look at a few of the moments when this unspoken rule has been broken. DISTANCES: Using… Read More