Period: c20th

Protected: Morris & O’Connor

Protected: Morris & O’Connor

By Janet Parks

There is no excerpt because this is a protected post.

Fernando Higueras: The Volcano, The Flower, and The Dromedary

Fernando Higueras: The Volcano, The Flower, and The Dromedary

By Guillermo S. Arsuaga

From eighteenth century primitive huts to the rise of barn living in the 1970s, buildings have served as the conceptual boundary between primordial formlessness and the organised world. But what if architecture begins with the very nature that it was invented to exclude? In 1971, the Madrilenian architect Fernando Higueras… Read More

CP138 Gordon Matta-Clark: Readings of the Archive (2020) – Review

CP138 Gordon Matta-Clark: Readings of the Archive (2020) – Review

By Penelope Curtis

The Gordon Matta-Clark archive arrived at the CCA in Montreal 20 years ago. Shortly thereafter, it was used as part of an ‘archival exercise’: Out of the Box: Price, Rossi, Stirling + Matta Clark (23 October 2003–6 September 2004). That first ‘Out of the Box’ prefigures the one undertaken for this publication,… Read More

The Evolving Role of Drawing

The Evolving Role of Drawing

By Nicholas Olsberg

This text was first published in The Architectural Review in 2013. Carlo Scarpa, in a famously infamous gesture, opened all his courses in design at the University of Venice by demonstrating the art of sharpening a pencil. That was the precise point, he claimed, from which all architecture proceeds. And… Read More

Do You Remember How Perfect Everything Was? The Work of Zoe Zenghelis (2021) – Review

Do You Remember How Perfect Everything Was? The Work of Zoe Zenghelis (2021) – Review

By Richard Hall

During the spring and summer of 2021, a two-part exhibition of the work of Zoe Zenghelis was shown in London. The first show was an enjoyably intimate immersion at Betts Project in Clerkenwell. The second, a more extensive review at the Architectural Association. Later that year a thick, crisply designed… Read More

The Iterative Power of Architecture’s Absence

The Iterative Power of Architecture’s Absence

By Peter Sealy

In 1991, the Swiss architects Herzog & de Meuron prepared a submission with the artist Remy Zaugg for the Berlin Morgen (‘Berlin Tomorrow’) exhibition organised by the Deutsches Architekturmuseum in Frankfurt, Germany. By surrounding Berlin’s Tiergarten with four new buildings, they proposed to restructure the park – then perceived as… Read More

Protected: Bob Maxwell

Protected: Bob Maxwell

By Colin Rowe

There is no excerpt because this is a protected post.

In the Archive: Laugier, Eisen, Boulogne, Petitot, Percier, Dumont, Hadid

In the Archive: Laugier, Eisen, Boulogne, Petitot, Percier, Dumont, Hadid

By Christiane Matt

Click on drawings to move, enlarge, and identify. On a crisp January morning I made my way to York railway station to visit the Drawing Matter collection. This research trip is more than a year overdue, delayed by the global Covid-19 pandemic, and I am now already in the third… Read More

Wood & Harrison: A Film About a City

Wood & Harrison: A Film About a City

By Paul Harrison and John Wood

We are not architects. I mean, if you insist, we could probably knock something up, but we are not that good at maths, and not really that great with materials. ‘Wood and Harrison – Architects. You’ll be knocked out by our buildings’. But we have always been interested in architecture.… Read More

Exhibition Design: Charging the Void

Exhibition Design: Charging the Void

By Claire Oster

Last year at Cornell University, five students in Alessandra Cianchetta’s design studio Global Artscapes worked on designs for a gallery in the valley at Shatwell. For this, they used photographs and videos in default of a site visit. The brief was for an exhibition space to accommodate the display of… Read More

Room at the Top?: Kate Macintosh, Denise Scott Brown and the kingmaker-critic

Room at the Top?: Kate Macintosh, Denise Scott Brown and the kingmaker-critic

By Emily Dan

All creative disciplines rely on the mythologies of heroes: intellectual bigwigs who shape a profession’s academic and visual frameworks. A lengthy period of university study gives plenty of time for architecture students to ruminate on which white, male ‘guru’ to call their own — Corb, Aalto, Rossi, Scarpa? Drawings are… Read More

What’s a Bludder Sketch?

What’s a Bludder Sketch?

By Declan Quirke

In October 2020, as a timid foreigner in the Swedish Centre for Architecture and Design, shuffling through hundreds of important-looking drawings, I stumbled across a funny little sketch in whose lines I found some humanity. It was made by Bengt Lindroos in 1981, and is an imagined view of his… Read More